Not every day you see a sailboat at Pony Pasture

Not every day you see a sailboat at Pony PastureYou’d better act fast and get down to Pony Pasture Rapids Park to see a sailboat “docked” along the south bank of the river. It may not stay longer than the next big rainstorm.

Dinghy about 16 feet from bow to stern and about 10 feet wide, made from driftwood, sticks and logs A couple of creative minds with active bodies this past weekend created a small-scale dinghy that was about 16 feet from bow to stern and about 10 feet wide, made from driftwood, sticks, logs and entire trees along a spot where these materials gather on the bank along the River Trail.

Ken Huston and R.L. Croft and the driftwood dinghyFellow Friend of the James River Park member, Molly Dellinger-Wray, snapped a photo and spoke with the artists, Ken Huston and R.L. Croft who are from Northern Virginia. Croft’s website declares that he is prone to creating impromptu, temporary site projects with natural found materials. Among many locations listed, he claims to have created several at Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge in the Outer Banks of North Carolina.

The artwork is something like that of British artist Andy Goldsworthy, who likes to take found objects in a landscape and rearrange them into natural and environmental works of art.

Wouldn’t it be wonderful to have a weekend dedicated to natural and environmental works of art in the James River Park System? There is an abundance of materials that could be repurposed and left on display for as long as they could last. Belle Isle or even Brown’s Island would be a perfect place to display the work. We’re used to people arranging and stacking smooth river rocks in the park, but maybe a driftwood contest would be a safer, fun and more appropriate event.

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4 responses to “Not every day you see a sailboat at Pony Pasture

  1. Agreed, that would be a great contest.

  2. great contest indeed. but doesnt the park system encourage leaving debris and other natural stuff on site?

  3. Glad we could leave a gift for the city of Richmond. It started out to be a drawing based on Van Gogh’s painting of fishing boats on a beach, but ended up being an homage to the dark seascapes of Albert Pinkham Ryder’s ships at sea, hence its title, “Shipwreck, APR.” You may see more of my outdoor drawings-in-the-wild on my website, some done with Ken Huston, retired photography professor and sculptor, and some with Michael Anthony, a Maryland ceramic artist. The tendency for people to mention Andy Goldsworthy as a comparison is partly accurate, but I identify more with native land art of all eras. I find Goldsworthy’s work to be a bit to “pretty” and decorative for my tastes, with more preference for something along the lines of David Nash. However, most of my work, including the outdoor efforts come from the influence of many artists, most notable among them, Duchamp, Guston, Westermann, Ryder, Vincent, Giacometti, Nevelson, DeKooning, etc.

    We’ll be back to Richmond in the future!

  4. Pingback: Boat at Pony Pasture survives water levels at more than 11 feet | James River News Hub

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